Stage II Melanoma

Stage II melanoma is defined by tumor thickness and ulceration. There is no evidence the cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes or to distant sites (metastasis).

Stage 1 & 2 Melanoma

Ulceration = the skin that covers a part of the primary melanoma is broken. Not seen by the naked eye, only through the microscope by a pathologist.

Stage II: Melanoma "localized tumor"

Subclasses IIA, IIB, IIC

Differentiated by tumor thickness [Breslow depth]

It hasn’t spread to nearby lymph nodes or distant sites

Risk: intermediate for occurring again in the same spot or spreading to distant sites.

Stage II Melanomas are Defined by 2 Primary Characteristics:

  • Tumor thickness (Breslow Depth): how deeply the tumor has penetrated the skin. Thickness is measured in millimeters (mm). For example:
    • 1 mm = .04 inch, or less than 1/16 inch (about equal to the edge of a penny)
    • 2 mm = between 1/16 and 1/8 inch (about equal to the edge of a nickel)
    • 4 mm = between 1/8 and 1/4 inch (about equal to the edges of two nickels)

     

  • Ulceration: when the epidermis (or top layer of skin) that covers a portion of the primary melanoma is not intact. Ulceration can only be seen under a microscope, not by the naked eye.

There Are 3 Subclasses of Stage II Melanoma:

Stage IIA (T2bN0M0 or T3aN0M0)

T2b:  tumor is 1.01 – 2.0 mm thick, with ulceration
T3a:  tumor is 2.01 – 4.0 mm thick, with no ulceration
N0: No spread to nearby lymph nodes
M0: No evidence of metastasis to distant sites

Stage IIB (T3N0M0 or T4aN0M0)

T3b: tumor is 2.01 – 4.0 mm thick, with ulceration
T4a: tumor is greater than 4.0 mm thick, with no ulceration
N0: No spread to nearby lymph nodes
M0: No evidence of metastasis to distant sites

Stage IIC (T4bN0M0)

T4b: tumor is greater than 4.0 mm thick, with ulceration
N0: No spread to nearby lymph nodes
M0: No evidence of metastasis to distant sites

Risk: With treatment, Stage II melanoma is considered intermediate to high risk for local recurrence or distant metastasis. Keep in mind that the statistics shown for survival are only averages; everyone’s cancer and survival rates is based on many factors and determined on an individual basis.

For more information, see stage II follow-up

Please keep me informed.

Receive comprehensive, breaking news about melanoma, research, legislation, and events.

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.